3 nieuwe werken voor de permanente tentoonstelling Louise Bourgeois in Oslo

Het museum voor hedendaagse kunst in Oslo had al een collectie werken van Louise Bourgeois in haar permanente tentoonstelling over de kunstenares. Het heeft er nu nog drie werken aan toegevoegd, waardoor het nog een rijker beeld biedt van de diversiteit in het werk van Bourgeois.

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De perstekst geeft verder uitleg over de werken die er te zien zijn:

Impure sculpture
Both sculptures in the exhibit are from the late sixties, created during a period when Bourgeois was working with latex and clay paving the way for the abject art style. Abject art relates to the body or aspects of the body that are deemed impure or inappropriate for public display. Many feminist artists explored the abject style in response to the “abjecting” of the female body in patriarchal societies. A few years later Bourgeois became outspokenly feminist and fought for the use of explicitly sexual imagery in art.

Avenza Revisited looks like a pile of mud or excrement running down form a cluster of egg-like protuberances. The strange forms remind us not just of eggs in a nest, but also of bits of human anatomy, particularly breasts, or details of female and male sexual organs, like the glans, the scrotum or the clitoris.

Sexual drawings
The Family is a series of twelve drawings of a couple in gouache: a round pregnant figure and a man with an erect penis. Depicted frontally with a cluster of five breast-like elements around her neck, the mother figure appears self-contained. The erect phallus of the male figure intruding from the side indicates sexual interest and affection but also threatens to puncture the huge ballooning belly of the female figure.

Feminist motives
The drypoint etching Sainte Sébastienne shows a running female figure without a head, shot by arrows. She alters the Christian story of Saint Sebastian the martyr, rendering him as a woman. Overly sexualized, with enormous breasts, belly and buttocks, the female body is depicted here as the object of constant aggression and attack. Lacking a head and arms, she is powerless to defend herself.

 

Wellicht een omwegje waard. Meer info vind je op de website van het Museum of Contemporary Art van Oslo, klik hier!

Frederic De Meyer

Frederic De Meyer

Art crunches: Bernard Frize, Banksy, Zou, Chinese art, MadC, Dan Witz
Frederic De Meyer

Author: Frederic De Meyer

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